Tag Archives: grade 1 math

Place Value in Primary: Developing Number Sense

Place Value in PrimaryWow. I have had the most extraordinary summer. Truly extraordinary. And somehow between engaging in a series of remarkable, life-affirming adventures ¬†I have managed to write another teacher resource book… ūüėä

It’s all about Place Value (as I’m sure you’ve figured out!) and is intended for teachers of kindergarten through grade 2, with special accommodations for¬†those who teach in combined grades settings. ¬†There are 230 pages of developmentally framed lessons designed to address the diversity in our primary classrooms. Each one supports¬†students to represent and describe quantity, to compare and order sets, to use referents to estimate and to skip count. Lessons devoted to measurement — an ideal practical application of¬†place value in the world — are also¬†featured. Whole class lessons, centres tasks and games ¬†for practice allow students to connect these important concepts in a seamless way, and can be used both as a unit or¬†spread throughout the year to build and consolidate understanding.

Place Value in Primary: Developing Number Sense is available from my online store for $40 plus shipping. I hope you enjoy it!

Carole

(PS…¬†A companion volume for Grades 2 to 4 is in the works – expect it later this fall!)

 

Find It! A Subitizing Game

Good morning!

In Kindergarten and Grade 1, students need practice subitizing. ¬†That is, being able to recognize at a glance and name familiar arrangements of objects without counting. ¬†It’s an important precursor to estimation, skip counting and multiplication, and depends on students’ understandings of conservation — that 5 is 5, no matter how it is arranged.

find it game partners exampleIn this simple partner game, students roll a standard die and then find a cell with the same number of dots. They cover the dots with a counter in their colour and then give their partner a turn. Three in a row in a single colour wins the game.

Small groups or even the whole class can play the Bingo version of this game.¬†Each student needs a bingo card and a small handful of counters in a single colour. Have the “caller” roll a die and call out the number to be covered. ¬†As in traditional Bingo, three in a line (across, down or diagonal) wins the round.

Click on the links below to download the partner game and/or the Bingo version of this game.

Enjoy!

Carole

Find it – Add and Count for K&1

Find It Bingo forms 3by3

Math and Literature Resource for Grades K-3

cover read a storyHello all!

My colleague Sandra Ball and I have completed another resource for primary teachers!

Read A Story: Explore The Math promotes the teaching of important math concepts through the context of great children’s books… ¬†The lessons span K-3 and some are even¬†appropriate for grades 3/4 classrooms. ¬†Lessons involving number sense and operations, data management, measurement and more are included in this 65 page resource. Scan through the list of titles and corresponding math concepts to sort out which children’s books would be a best¬†fit for you and your students. ¬†The complete set of ISBN numbers for each of the stories¬†is¬†included so you¬†can easily share ordering information with your teacher librarian…!

To download, please visit my online store (https://mindfull.ecwid.com) and click on the FREE DOWNLOADS icon.

Enjoy!

Carole

 

Daily Math Investigations for K-2 ‚Äď An Alternative to Calendar

Daily Math Investigations

Sandra Ball and I are pleased to announce the release of our newest collaboration, entitled Daily Math Investigations: Meaningful Math Routines. The resource is intended to present alternatives to a traditional calendar time Рways to keep our students actively engaged in the learning of mathematics in meaningful, hands-on and developmentally appropriate ways.

In the resource, you’ll find a set of thoughtful tasks that promote visual spatial capacity, number sense, operational sense, data and measurement concepts. Each is presented in the form of both entry tasks and rich routines, intended to keep your youngest students thinking and reasoning mathematically.  The complete resource, including a selection of classroom-ready line masters, is available to download for free, by visiting my online store at https://mindfull.ecwid.com. Click on the FREE DOWNLOADS icon to access the PDFs.

We sincerely hope that this resource provides you with practical, fun and engaging ideas for use your primary classroom – ways to ensure all students are doing math every day!

Carole and Sandra

 

Teaching Addition and Subtraction in Grades 1&2

Sums & DifferencesHello and happy August!

I have been busy writing this summer ‚Äď putting together a volume devoted to teaching the operations in primary. And so, I am pleased to announce the publication of my latest teacher resource: Sums and Differences: Teaching Addition and Subtraction in Grades 1&2.

This resource includes a series of lesson sequences ‚Äď open tasks, games, written practice, word problems and assessment support ‚Äď for teaching the operations in a developmentally appropriate way. Beginning with place value explorations, these lessons increase in complexity while providing support for students across the grades. ¬†The lessons make explicit connections between concrete, pictorial and abstract representations of the math to ensure the operations are truly mastered.

The content in the book covers the grade 1 and 2 curricula and presents them in such a way that teachers of combined grades can use the lessons to work with their classes as a whole.

To order a copy online, click here.

All the best!

Carole

Representing number in many ways…

Hello all!

 

I wanted to follow up with my colleagues who attended the k and k/1 sessions in Langley on Friday. I showed some materials that I then promised to upload to the blog – and then promptly forgot! ¬†Here are the files… ¬†ūüôā

 

For those of you who were not in attendance, the idea is simple.  Young children need the opportunity to represent number in many ways to truly make sense of it.  Our youngest learners need more than most to make sense of the squiggles we call digits by building, comparing, partitioning and learning to subitize amounts to five Рand then from 5 through ten. Consider these cards, images and frames for representing number as part of your opening activities, a centre or as meaningful practice following on from a lesson.  Students love the chance to roll a die and say how many Рand then to build and record what happened!  The files are below Рand are included in French as well.

ūüôā

Number 3 Ways to 5 – English

Number 3 Ways to 10 – English

Number 3 Ways to 5 – French

Number 3 Ways to 10 – French

Carole

PS – Use the “finger cards” to create sets that make five like in the Room on the Broom task, below. ¬†Copy the cards, cut them out and then distribute them in pairs so that you know that every child in the room will be able to find their missing part (ie, be sire to hand out a 2 and a 3, a 4 and a 1, and a 5 and a zero…). ¬†You might consider NOT using the 5 and zero pairing – seems sort of unkind to leave a child with nothing in front of them!!

 

 

Hallowe’en Math – Getting to 5 in Kindergarten

Happy Fall!
boooooo

I wanted to send along a¬†list of¬†spooky¬†books¬†for math investigations¬†for spreading the Hallowe’en math love. I hope you can find some or all of these in your school libraries… There are so many fun contexts to explore around this season – from notions of pumpkin circumference to skip counting, from growing patterns to playing with the operations and the complements of 5 and 10.

One of my favourite contexts for thinking about parts of 5 stems from a story called¬†Room on the Broom. Just this week I worked in a K/1 classroom and explored the missing part – or complement – of 5. Then we read the book by Julia Donaldson, in which a witch and her friends fly about on a broomstick – adding a friend until there are 5 on the broomstick in all.¬†We “built” some of the book’s illustrations in egg carton 5-frames, and talked about how much room was still left on our broom, if our brooms, like hers, ¬†had 5 seats.

Next, I whispered a number from 1-4 in each child’s ear (I left off zero and five for this initial exploration…) and had them build that number in their 5-frame broomstick. Then I asked the children “How much room is on your broom?”.¬†The K/1 kids then had to find the person whose broom “completed” their’s… Click to take a look in the pictures below:

a child with 2 on his broom finds a child with three on her broom:
3 and 2

and they put their brooms together (one on top of the other) to fill it up.
brooms together

The egg cartons I like best are clear plastic ones – and you can see why… looking through one 5-frame to the other is a powerful way to see the parts of 5!

recording thinking

After a couple of turns with this game, I asked children to¬†record what they did¬†and how they filled up the room on their broom with their partner. You are welcome to use the¬†There‚Äôs More Room on my¬†Broom!¬†line master¬†to try this with your students as well. In this photo, you can see see one of the grade 1 students working to show her thinking on the form…

 

Have a fun and spooky mathy season!
Carole

Magic Squares – Online

Here’s a fun little game for primary classrooms… The Magic Squares game provides students with a total for each row and column, as well as a few key starting numbers. ¬†Use the magic wand to place the correct digits from the set of numbers at the bottom of the screen. ¬†Double click to grab and then place the correct numerals in the grid.

Each game sets a different total for the rows and columns, so students can choose a number that makes sense for them before beginning.

The challenge of finding a sum for 3 addends is a good one for late grade 1 (when the digits without images to accompany them make sense) through grades 3.

Have fun!

Carole

Lucky Ducky – A Subtraction Game

I just had to share! ¬†Here’s a game drawn from my new Mastering the Facts: Subtraction resource, called¬†Lucky Ducky!

Students play the game “Lucky Ducky” in partners. ¬†They’ll need 15 counters (or cubes) each as well as a 10-sided die.

Before they start playing, children decide who will be the odd numbers and who will be the evens…

Each player subtracts from 18 on their turn.

Player A rolls the die and reads the number.  She subtracts this number from 18 and puts a counter on the difference.

Player B has their turn, and play continues until all the counters are used up.

The player who is “Odds” collects all the counters that have been placed on odd differences on the board (9, 11, 13, 15, etc). The player who is “Evens” collects all the counters placed on the even differences (10, 12, 14, 16, etc).

The player with the most counters at the end of the game is the winner!

Have fun….

Carole

PS РThis game was drawn from my Mastering the Facts РSubtraction resource.  To order online, click here.

The What Do They Know Assessment for Grades 1& 2

Hello to my colleagues and friends…

Last spring, Sandra Ball (Surrey School District) and I crafted an assessment and instructional resource for kindergarten and K/1 classrooms. ¬†Focussed on subitizing, partitioning and patterning, this tool is designed to be administered in the fall and again in the spring of the year. ¬†Teachers work with the whole class or with small groups when performing the assessment. ¬† The tasks are drawn from story contexts to make them connected and authentic. ¬†Kids have fun showing what they know and can do! ¬†Hence the name – The “What Do They Know” Assessment. ¬†:o)

THIS spring, Sandra and I put together the companion resource for grade 1 and 2 classrooms. Again, we focus on subitizing and partitioning, but now we extend notions of patterning to include skip counting.

Best of all, an instructional component accompanies both the K/1 and Grades 1/2 resources, to help guide your teaching between assessments!

Sandra and I would like to invite you to download and use these assessments with your students this fall.  They can be found by going to my online store (https://mindfull.ecwid.com) and click on the FREE DOWNLOADS icon.

Have an amazing year! Enjoy every minute.

Carole (and Sandra!)

To learn more about the K/1 resource, its design and intent, please click here to read an article from the September 2011 edition of the BC Association of Mathematics Teachers’ journal, Vector.

New Resource! Mastering the Facts – Subtraction

You know, some people holiday over the summer.  Me, I seem to write teacher resources.  :o)

I am very pleased to announce the release of my newest resource called Mastering the Facts – Subtraction: Lessons for Making Sense of Subtraction for grades 1 to 3. This teacher book includes 17 complete lessons aimed at supporting primary aged students in mastering the subtraction facts to 20. Each strategy-based lesson features:

  • a 3-part direct instruction lesson
  • a task for guided practice
  • games and worksheets for independent practice
  • open-ended story problems
  • targeted fluency building opportunities
  • an assessment task customized to match the facts learned

All the lines masters for games, written practice, flash cards, teacher materials and other instructional support are included in this 185 page resource. Organized by strategy, these lessons are designed to promote mastery of the facts, not just memorization!  Teacher tips for using and organizing manipulatives, for supporting students who struggle and for working in a combined grades setting are also included.

Matched to the WNCP and BC math curricula, this book is designed for classroom teachers of grades 1 to 3 and primary resource teachers. Select lessons are suitable for kindergarten students as well.

Cost for the resource is $40 plus shipping.

If you’re interested in getting your hands on a copy, click here to order online.

Thanks for your ongoing support. I hope the book proves helpful.

Carole

PS – Please click below to download select colour line masters drawn from the resource. ¬†All other line masters are included and are to be copied onto black and white, but these ones deserved a little colour…!

rocket ship

Houses for number lines extra large

Hallowe’en Math – and the spooky complement of 5

Happy Fall!
boooooo

I wanted to send along a list of spooky¬†books for math investigations for spreading the Hallowe’en math love. I hope you can find some or all of these in your school libraries… There are so many fun contexts to explore around this season – from notions of pumpkin circumference to skip counting, from growing patterns to playing with the operations and the complements of 5 and 10.

One of my favourite contexts for thinking about parts of 5 stems from a story called¬†Room on the Broom. Just this week I worked in a K/1 classroom and explored the missing part – or complement – of 5. Then we read the book by Julia Donaldson, in which a witch and her friends fly about on a broomstick – adding a friend until there are 5 on the broomstick in all. We “built” some of the book’s illustrations in egg carton 5-frames, and talked about how much room was still left on our broom, if our brooms, like hers, ¬†had 5 seats.

Next, I whispered a number from 1-4 in each child’s ear (I left off zero and five for this initial exploration…) and had them build that number in their 5-frame broomstick. Then I asked the children “How much room is on your broom?”. The K/1 kids then had to find the person whose broom “completed” their’s… Click to take a look in the pictures below:

a child with 2 on his broom finds a child with three on her broom:
3 and 2

and they put their brooms together (one on top of the other) to fill it up.
brooms together

The egg cartons I like best are clear plastic ones – and you can see why… looking through one 5-frame to the other is a powerful way to see the parts of 5!

After a couple of turns with this game, I asked children to record what they did and how they filled up the room on their broom with their partner. You are welcome to use the There‚Äôs More Room on my¬†Broom! line master to try this with your students as well. In the photo below, you can see see one of the grade 1 students working to show her thinking on the form…

recording thinking

Have a fun and spooky mathy season!
Carole