Tag Archives: middle school math games

Deep Sea Duel – A mental math and logic game for all

I discovered this engaging game a week or so ago and wanted to share.  It’s called Deep Sea Duel. In the game, you match wits with the computer in the form of an octopus called Okta.  (She’s the same character as in the iPad game called Pick-a-Path, below).  When you square off against Okta, you can choose the level of difficulty and her level of “nastiness”.  Good thing too.  It took me a while to sort out a strategy for winning when things were too easy, and I had to crank up the nastiness in order to really understand the game and its complexity. The thing that I hadn’t considered was that Okta could win with ANY of her 3 (4) cards – not just the first 3 – if that makes any sense. 😛

The goal of the game is to reach a target number by adding a set of cards together. You and Okta take turns. As you play, keep track of both your score and Okta’s to be able to block her attempts to collect three (or 4) cards with the specified total before you can!  There’s a ton of mental math going on in this game – and, if you’re up for it, you can move into decimal numbers too…!!

Enjoy…!  More games and links like these can be found on the NCTM Illuminations webpage.

Carole

Challenging Math game for the iPad for grades 2-9

Hello all…

The iPad sensation is truly wild. I have one (of course) and use it often to present mathematical ideas and problems, stories with a mathy context and visual manipulatives to my students while I teach in classrooms around the province and territory. What I struggle with is the never-ending search for quality math games for the iPad that amount to more than digital drill…  :oP  Surely the technology can offer up something more thought-full??

I found an app this week that is worth sharing, called Pick-A-Path.  It was released by the NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) and features a number-puzzle for students to solve. The goal of the game is to navigate a maze, moving an octopus (Okta) through a series of numbers and operations, trying to create a maximum or exact amount.  In the different levels, students use whole numbers, powers of ten, integers, fractions, exponents and decimals to solve the puzzles, gaining “starfish” as prizes.  It had me hooked! Because for the different levels, I can see it being used from grades 2/3 through grade 9 — if you want to stick to the curriculum precisely — and beyond that, if you’re looking for a challenging game.  Oh – and it’s free!

Enjoy!

Carole