Tag Archives: subtraction

Financial Literacy in Primary – Thinking About Money in the Canadian Classroom

Cover Financial LitHello to my friends near and far…  It has been a long time since I have posted anything to my blog, and for that I am truly sorry.  To my faithful visitors, I offer you my thanks. I hope this latest instalment has been worth the wait!

My newest collaboration — as always, co-created with the inimitable Sandra Ball — is entitled Financial Literacy In Primary: Thinking About Money in the Canadian Classroom. This full-colour, 50 page resource is free to download – but you’ll need a password to access it. Please use the form below to contact me for the secret code. Read on to learn more. Enjoy!   Carole

Financial Literacy — An Important Aspect of Numeracy

Beginning in the fall of 2016, concepts addressing financial literacy are being introduced to the Western Canadian mathematics curriculum. Although they have been included at the middle school level for a number of years, this is the first time that financial literacy as been highlighted in elementary — and most notably at the primary level. This raises some important questions. What is financial literacy at the primary level anyway? Certainly it is more than recognizing and naming Canadian coins! Structured instead around notions of earning, saving and spending and giving money, curricular outcomes dedicated to financial literacy are intended to look more deeply at what it means to be financially responsible.

Our youngest learners need support and explicit teaching to reach these goals. Engaging, authentic and meaningful tasks are critically important. Learning about money should be fun, of course, but should include notions of social responsibility — earning, saving and giving — as well as spending!

Playing with Money: Connecting to Number Sense

Screen Shot 2015-06-10 at 7.38.05 PMIn this new resource, Sandra and I have crafted a series of lessons to support teachers in introducing and developing ideas around financial literacy in Kindergarten through Grade 3. Currently there are few — if any — resources devoted to these ideas for primary students. We are hopeful this resource will fill that need!

Rich tasks, literature connections and games for practice in this resource are laid out along a continuum and are intended to be used across grades. In alignment with our new curriculum, these lessons are connected to both the core competencies (Thinking, Communicating and Personal and Social Responsibility) as well as to the curricular competenciesfor mathematics. By integrating financial literacy into our math program in primary, we create meaningful contexts for the math we are learning.

Think of the mathematical expertise our students will build as we represent and describe money amounts, compare and order values, skip count with coins and bills, use place value understandings and add and subtract dollar amounts!

Screen Shot 2015-06-10 at 7.38.24 PMThe Math Big Ideas for Financial Literacy

This teacher resource is structured around a set of Big Math Ideas for earning money, saving money and spending and giving money. These enduring understandings apply across the primary grades and beyond. By addressing these Big Math Ideas in developmentally appropriate and engaging ways we can ensure students have fun while they lay the foundations for ensuring financially responsible decision-making.

Sandra and I hope that this resource proves useful to you and fun for your students!

To download the materials, visit my online store (https://mindfull.ecwid.com) and click on the FREE DOWNLOADS icon.

Enjoy!

Carole

Mental Math Game – Grades 3 and up

I came across an interesting game today in my perpetual on-line search for quality math games that promote thinking. It’s called Mission 211 – Mental Maths.

A video transmission from mission control’s Caleb explains the tasks at hand.  You must answer mental math questions as quickly as you can in order to collect biofuel rods and foil the evil roboids..!!  Best of all, Caleb provides strategies for solving the problems, if you need his help.  The strategies include “counting on”, “breaking down numbers” and “rounding” – what we might call compensation or friendly numbers.

The music and the heartbeat in the background (yes, really!) create a sense of urgency, and encourage you to complete the questions as quickly as you can.  If you need help, pressing the “HINT” button produces a mental math strategy to one side of the screen.  It’s a super helpful scaffold, and one that helps to make the numbers meaningful.  As you progress through the game, there are true or false multiplication and division questions as well – a nice blend of methods and ways of presenting content.

I like it!

Now – back to the game.  I’ve got some evil roboids to destroy.  🙂

Carole

PS – Play the game in FULL SCREEN MODE to avoid silly advertising

Lucky Ducky – A Subtraction Game

I just had to share!  Here’s a game drawn from my new Mastering the Facts: Subtraction resource, called Lucky Ducky!

Students play the game “Lucky Ducky” in partners.  They’ll need 15 counters (or cubes) each as well as a 10-sided die.

Before they start playing, children decide who will be the odd numbers and who will be the evens…

Each player subtracts from 18 on their turn.

Player A rolls the die and reads the number.  She subtracts this number from 18 and puts a counter on the difference.

Player B has their turn, and play continues until all the counters are used up.

The player who is “Odds” collects all the counters that have been placed on odd differences on the board (9, 11, 13, 15, etc). The player who is “Evens” collects all the counters placed on the even differences (10, 12, 14, 16, etc).

The player with the most counters at the end of the game is the winner!

Have fun….

Carole

PS – This game was drawn from my Mastering the Facts – Subtraction resource.  To order online, click here.

New Resource! Mastering the Facts – Subtraction

You know, some people holiday over the summer.  Me, I seem to write teacher resources.  :o)

I am very pleased to announce the release of my newest resource called Mastering the Facts – Subtraction: Lessons for Making Sense of Subtraction for grades 1 to 3. This teacher book includes 17 complete lessons aimed at supporting primary aged students in mastering the subtraction facts to 20. Each strategy-based lesson features:

  • a 3-part direct instruction lesson
  • a task for guided practice
  • games and worksheets for independent practice
  • open-ended story problems
  • targeted fluency building opportunities
  • an assessment task customized to match the facts learned

All the lines masters for games, written practice, flash cards, teacher materials and other instructional support are included in this 185 page resource. Organized by strategy, these lessons are designed to promote mastery of the facts, not just memorization!  Teacher tips for using and organizing manipulatives, for supporting students who struggle and for working in a combined grades setting are also included.

Matched to the WNCP and BC math curricula, this book is designed for classroom teachers of grades 1 to 3 and primary resource teachers. Select lessons are suitable for kindergarten students as well.

Cost for the resource is $40 plus shipping.

If you’re interested in getting your hands on a copy, click here to order online.

Thanks for your ongoing support. I hope the book proves helpful.

Carole

PS – Please click below to download select colour line masters drawn from the resource.  All other line masters are included and are to be copied onto black and white, but these ones deserved a little colour…!

rocket ship

Houses for number lines extra large

Story Mats – Setting the stage for number stories

When I work in early primary classrooms, I like to bring interesting counters to play with – farm animals, lizards, insects, dinosaur, frogs and ladybugs are among my favourites.  With these creatures, there are so many things to count and sort and examine – far more than on a standard cube or round counter.  Best of all, these “creature counters” can move – and as the creatures crawl, slide, hop and gallop, they mirror the important action in a math problem.  Traditionally, we understand addition as the joining of sets, and subtraction as the separating of it.  When children have manipulatives that are capable of movement, they can model these actions to tell addition and subtraction stories!

One way to promote this kind of thinking is to provide students with a “story mat” for their counters.  Because I have dinosaurs and lizards, bugs and frogs in my “creature counter” collection, I print off lily pads and farm scenes, jungles and dessert habitats for the creatures to explore.  As the children play, horses joining others in a grassy field are transformed into addition stories; frogs hopping off of lily pads become subtraction stories – all we have to do is to name it for them, and for those who are ready, to introduce a structure for recording their thinking.

I know that some of you have asked for these story mats, so I have attached them here:

addition-stories-backgrounds.

Have fun!

Carole